Catalog Sections:
  Accounting
  Advertising
  Africa
  African American studies
  Anthropology
  Architecture
  Art
  Astronomy
  Biology
  China
  Communications
  Computers
  Criminology
  Employee Relations
  Environmental Science
  Film
  Finance
  Foreign Governments
  Foreign Policy (U.S.)
  Gender & Sexuality
  HR Management
  International Relations
  International Trade
  Internet
  Japan
  Journalism
  Juvenile Delinquency
  Labor
  Latin America
  Linguistics
  MIS
  Managerial Science
  Marketing
  Marx and Marxism
  Math
  Medicine and Health Care
  Middle East
  Minorities (other than Blacks)
  Music
  Nursing
  Penology
  Personality Theory
  Personnel Management
  Physical Education
  Police Science
  Political Science (non-US)
  Political Science (U.S.)
  Political Theory
  Psychopathology
  Psychotherapy
  Public Administration
  Religion (Judeo-Christian)
  Religion (non-Judeo Christian)
  Sexuality
  Shakespeare
  Social Problems
  Sports
  Television and Radio
  Third World Asia
  Urban Studies
  Women's Studies
  Search by topic:  
18175. Extraordinary Renditions: Legality. This paper presents an overview and legal analysis of the Bush Administration’s post-911 counterterrorism practice of having the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) detain and deliver suspected terrorists to foreign governments for interrogation and possibly torture. After briefly describing extraordinary renditions and discussing the Bush Administration’s justifications and claims of legality versus critics’ contention that the practice is illegal, this paper reviews the various treaties, conventions, covenants, and other international legal documents to assess the legality of the US programs of extraordinary renditions. The essay concludes that the US program of extraordinary renditions represents a clear violation of international law in that such renditions violate the provisions of a number of different international treaties and covenants (including the Geneva Conventions, the International Covenant on Civil & Political Rights (ICCPR), and the Convention Against Torture) to which the United States is party. KEYWORDS: terrorists counterterrorist policy us war on terror bush extraordinary rendition torture guantanamo prisoners international law treaty. Turabian with Endnotes. 19 pages, 70 footnotes, 28 bibliographic sources. 4,505 words excluding footnotes.   $133


Copyright 1998-2018 Berkeley Research